Persimmon Upside Down Cake (sort of)

by Tokyo Terrace on October 28, 2010

In Japan, one tell-tale sign of fall happens to be the drooping branches of a persimmon tree. Orange fruit accent a background of deep green leaves, brightening up often cloudy autumn skies.

I love persimmons. Not only do they taste wonderful, but they are a site to see in a simple bowl on the table. Their bright orange skin and earthy green stems make this fruit look made for an oil painting.

So I tried making a persimmon upside down cake yesterday. And failed. It looked beautiful, but the cake remained doughy in the middle even after extended baking. I have to make this work. Just because I wanna. Is a persimmon too low in sugar to use in this way? What gives?!?

Any suggestions?

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Share
  • http://www.formerchef.com Kristina

    Bummer about the fail, but it’s a beautiful photo anyway. I have a persimmon-cranberry bread I’ve been making for years (I have a tree). Last weekend I whipped up a batch, intending to share it on my blog for the first time. Guess what? I left out both the baking powder and the baking soda. They came out like heavy bricks, completely inedible. Could it be you need (more) baking powder or something like that?

  • Becky

    Maybe persimmons would be better for a crumble? That would be tasty too.

  • astrorainfall

    Oooo I love persimmons…I have at least one a day ;-) Your cake looks delish and homey…

  • danny

    Americas Test Kitchen just tried something similar recently, but it was apples. Depending on the consistency of the kaki you used, I wonder if the same/similar ideas would work?
    http://www.americastestkitchen.com/recipes/detail.php?docid=20278

  • Duchess

    Now you have me determined as well! I’m going to attempt this for Thanksgiving. Since I don’t know what the recipe was you used it could be almost anything… the oven, not enough baking soda or powder – also you may have had to cook the persimmons first to release their liquid? Maybe as it cooked, the juices prevented the cake from really cooking?

  • Gscarth

    I have 2 American persimmon trees in my yard and have noticed that the slightest cooking causes the fruit to almost totally lose its sweetness. The only way to preserve the sweetness is to either freeze or dry the fruit. I assume Japanese persimmons are the same.
    Geoff Scarth Chemistry Teacher @ St. Mary’s 1992-2003 currently living in the N. Georgia Mountains

  • Anonymous

    Thanks so much for your suggestion! I haven’t attempted this cake again, but perhaps someday…and with a different batter recipe!

  • Barb

    Hi.. I realize this is now several years down the road but as I was just
    researching upside down cakes and came across yours I thought that
    quite possibly there was too much liquid in your batter. Then after I
    continued my searching upside down cakes I came across one with the
    following quote from a British cake contest. One of the judges said ….

    ” “the fruit must hold its shape and not become mushy”. For Paul, it’s always about the ‘bake’.
    “It’s crucial” he said, “adding liquid to a batter and baking it so the top
    roasts and the sponge bakes properly is a real challenge”. ”

    I
    then returned to your site and thought I would write you even after so
    many years have now passed. I hope you finally got the cake made right
    and I still I hope you will share your recipe. Even though you said it
    was mushy your cake still looked like it would be fabulous. I even
    entertained thoughts of upside down persimmon pudding cake. ;) Thanks.

    Barb

  • Barb

    Hi.. I realize this is now several years down the road but as I was just
    researching upside down cakes and came across yours I thought that
    quite possibly there was too much liquid in your batter. Then after I
    continued my searching upside down cakes I came across one with the
    following quote from a British cake contest. One of the judges said ….

    ” “the fruit must hold its shape and not become mushy”. For Paul, it’s always about the ‘bake’.
    “It’s crucial” he said, “adding liquid to a batter and baking it so the top
    roasts and the sponge bakes properly is a real challenge”. ”

    I
    then returned to your site and thought I would write you even after so
    many years have now passed. I hope you finally got the cake made right
    and I still I hope you will share your recipe. Even though you said it
    was mushy your cake still looked like it would be fabulous. I even
    entertained thoughts of upside down persimmon pudding cake. ;) Thanks.

    Barb

Previous post:

Next post: